Lee Kuan Yew

 

Even children were penalized under the system, with a couple's third, fourth or later child being given lower priority in schools and top placement being reserved for first or second children of parents who had been sterilized before the age of 40.

Gynecologist Paul Tan told Singaporean journalist Mavis Toh that the school placement policy made the difference. “That was when people stopped reproducing,” he said. Tan recalled that sterilization rates “went sky-high,” with doctors at his hospital performing up to nine procedures a day.

INDIA

In INDIA, a similar slogan, "Us two, our two" (Hum do, hamare in Hindi), reminds families that for each couple, the government believes there should be only two children.  Couples who have more than two children are ineligible to run for local public office, and those who work for the government are denied employee housing if they have more than two children.  The nation’s birth rate has fallen from 5.7 per family in 1966 to 2.7 per family – roughly replacement rate in a developing nation like India – as of 2009.  Birth rates in many states within the country have actually fallen below replacement levels.

In 2010, India came under fire for its policy of providing financial incentives for sterilization operations in an effort to meet the “Millennium Development Goals” set for them by the United Nations, which demands that India reduce its birth rate to 2 children per mother by 2015. Presently, a full 37% of India’s female population has undergone sterilization, and 1% of the male population has undergone vasectomies. Critics warn that the procedures are often done in unsanitary conditions, with many women dying during the operation, and that women who are sterilized early in life are at increased risk for gynecological health problems.

 

In November 2014, it was reported that as part of a mass, government-run sterilization program, eight Indian women had died and 20 others were in critical condition after undergoing surgeries to help slow the country’s population growth.

The Blaze online news service reported the below suggesting that coercion was used in persuading poverty stricken women to undergo sterilisations.

While India’s central government stopped setting targets for sterilizing women in the 1990s, activists such as Brinda Karat of the All India Democratic Women’s Association say state governments still set sterilization quotas that lead health authorities to pressure patients into surgery rather than advising them on other forms of contraception.

Jagmati Sangwan, general secretary of the organization, wrote on the group’s Facebook page that it would be staging a protest over the “deep shock and outrage” felt over the “family planning camp’s” issues.

“These women have become victims because of the target-based approach to population control,” Karat told reporters Tuesday, while demanding that the state’s health minister resign.

READ MORE HERE from the Guardian and from the Blaze

       

KENYA

It was reported in late 2014, by LifeSiteNews, that Kenya’s Catholic bishops are charging two United Nations organizations with sterilizing millions of girls and women under cover of an anti-tetanus inoculation program sponsored by the Kenyan government.

According to a statement released Tuesday by the Kenya Catholic Doctors Association, the organization has found an antigen that causes miscarriages in a vaccine being administered to 2.3 million girls and women by the World Health Organization and UNICEF.

“We sent six samples from around Kenya to laboratories in South Africa. They tested positive for the HCG antigen,” Dr. Muhame Ngare of the Mercy Medical Centre in Nairobi told LifeSiteNews. “They were all laced with HCG.”

READ MORE HERE and HERE

 

India’s policy of providing financial incentives for sterilization operations in an effort to meet the “Millennium Development Goals” set for them by the United Nations, which demands that India reduce its birth rate to 2 children per mother by 2015. Presently, a full 37% of India’s female population has undergone sterilization, and 1% of the male population has undergone vasectomies. Critics warn that the procedures are often done in unsanitary conditions, with many women dying during the operation, and that women who are sterilized early in life are at increased risk for gynecological health problems. Most of those targeted for sterilization are poor villagers, who are deemed too ignorant to use less dangerous temporary birth control solutions. - See more at: http://www.quintessentialpublications.com/tracyrtwyman/?p=2719#sthash.wReD2bVu.dpuf
A new article from the Global Post examines India's policy of providing financial incentives for sterilization operations in an effort to meet the "Millennium Development Goals" set for them by the United Nations, which demands that India reduce its birth rate to 2 children per mother by 2015. Presently, a full 37% of India’s female population has undergone sterilization, and 1% of the male population has undergone vasectomies. Critics warn that the procedures are often done in unsanitary conditions, with many women dying during the operation, and that women who are sterilized early in life are at increased risk for gynecological health problems. Most of those targeted for sterilization are poor villagers, who are deemed too ignorant to use less dangerous temporary birth control solutions. Each operation is worth tens of thousands of rupees for all of the participants involved, including the doctors, the hospitals, and the patients. Advocates say that this policy is consensual and thus more ethical than the Indian government’s policy in the 1970s of forcing vasectomies on men with two or more children. - See more at: http://www.quintessentialpublications.com/tracyrtwyman/?p=2719#sthash.wReD2bVu.dpuf